Guest Post: Urban Adventurer’s Guide to Coffee

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This post comes from Gimoka Coffee UK and has two Authors: Rudy Caretti and Lorenzo  Agostinelli. It describes a brief history of Java from around the world. So let’s give it up for: 

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Since its discovery in the 9th Century, people around the world have loved coffee. The culture of drinking java has also evolved.  Let’s take an adventure through several nations across the globe to discover their unique tales and habits in coffee drinking.

Ethiopia- the cradle of java

A story is told about Kaldi the shepherd who existed in the 9th century. While herding his goats, he noticed that the animals become unusually excited when they ate berries of a shrub. Out of curiosity, he took some to a local monk and shared his observation.

The monks brushed off his story and threw the berries in the fire. It burned and produced an enticing aroma. Fellow monks, interested in thcoffee_rustic_rockinrandommome aroma, quickly removed the berries and ground them. They mixed the berries with water and brewed their first java. On drinking it, they realized that the drink was vitalizing. Later on, this drink would spread to the Arab countries and eventually reach the whole world through traders.

Kaldi’s encounter is told in many versions. Importantly, it offers a good narrative of where coffee came from and when it was first taken as a brew. Originally, these berries were ground and mixed with animal fat. Some people still consume it in this form today.

Europe- Finland

Although Finns do not grow the beans, they are the leading java drinkers in the world with an average per capita consumption of 12 kg per year. Coffee reached these wonderful people while under the Swedish rule in the 1700s. This was through Sweden and Russia.

Many factors lead to the popularity of this drink in Finland. Firstly, its introduction as a curative drug sold only in pharmacies. In the 1920s, a ban on alcohol consumption saw a huge increase in coffee consumption and its integration in main meals.

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North America- United States

The journey of the first coffee plant to American soil was a treacherous voyage that was mired with pirate attacks in the sea. Against all odds, a French sailor Gabriel du Clieu docked in the island of Martinique with this amazing seed in the year 1723. He had obtained it from the Royal Botanical Garden of King Louis XIV of France. This single plant would multiply into millions of coffee bushes in half a century. It spread to the rest of Caribbean island and eventually South America.

Today, the land of opportunity, as many would call the U.S., enjoys an undisputed position as the leading importer of coffee. Also, the number of coffee shops has continued to increase over the years, reaching 29,300 in 2013. This shows how the Americans are continually falling for java. Corporations like Starbucks have thrived because the American people love java brewed to perfection.

South America– Brazil

The coming of coffee to Brazil borders the story of a secret love affair. In 1927, Francisco de Melo, a man of fair looks was sent to French Guyana to resolve a border conflict. The governor’s wife fell for his looks and he used this opportunity to seduce her. He managed to get enough of these seeds camouflaged as a bouquet.  This was the beginning of a Java empire which is today the world’s number one producer. The Brazilian coffee industry is worth billions of US dollars.

Java is the leading beverage drink in Brazil. 97% of population aged 15 years and above consume coffee. As this giant producer continues to stabilize economically, consumption of this popular drink is expected to increase. This is because many people will be able to afford the commodity.

Australia

Australians could be at the furthest end of the world, but their taste for coffee is tip-top. Their exceptional taste and fixation in quality coffee have their roots in their first experience with this magnificent brew.

Coffee was introduced to Australians by Italian and Greek immigrants in the early 20th century. Out of their love for the drink, these immigrants packed Gaggia and stovetop espresso coffee makers as part of their belongings. They  shared their favorite drink with their new friends in Sydney and Melbourne. You can bet the Australians loved the experience.

As a result, businesses dealing with roasting, distribution, and brewing arose. In 1950, Italian-like cafes were gaining traction in Australia. Coffee culture in Australia, influenced by Italian and Greek cultures, grew significantly in 1980.

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Well, there you have it! What do you think? Below is the short bio of one of the authors and founder of the Gimoka Coffee UK.

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If you want to check out their site, visit GIMOKA COFFEE UK

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Thanks so much for reading!

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